Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights

eBook - 2012
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Considered lurid and shocking by mid-19th-century standards, Wuthering Heights was initially thought to be such a publishing risk that its author, Emily Bront︠, was asked to pay some of the publication costs. A somber tale of consuming passions and vengeance played out against the lonely moors of northern England, the book proved to be one of the most enduring classics of English literature. The turbulent and tempestuous love story of Cathy and Heathcliff spans two generations - from the time Heathcliff, a strange, coarse young boy, is brought to live on the Earnshaws' windswept estate, through Cathy's marriage to Edgar Linton and Heathcliff's plans for revenge, to Cathy's death years later and the eventual union of the surviving Earnshaw and Linton heirs. A masterpiece of imaginative fiction, Wuthering Heights (the author's only novel) remains as poignant and compelling today as it was when first published in 1847.
Publisher: [United States] : Dover Publications : Made available through hoopla, 2012
Characteristics: 1 online resource
Additional Contributors: hoopla digital
ISBN: 9780486114705
0486114708

Opinion

From Library Staff

List - Creepy Classics
SkokieStaff Oct 13, 2015

It doesn't feature monsters or supernatural creatures--unless you include Heathcliff's dramatic character or Cathy's ghost. Still, this is a can't-miss if you want to read something truly spooky and morbid. I read this my first semester in college and couldn't put it down! A grotesque love stor... Read More »


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b
Bren86
Jun 05, 2017

This electronic version appears to be missing pages.

JCLDebbieL Apr 21, 2017

How messed up are Catherine and Heathcliff? Sheesh! A rather dismal read.

d
dlh1
Mar 04, 2017

Highly overrated novel. There are soooooooo many other books worth reading. I'm sorry I wasted my time with this one. As others have said in their comments, this is not a love story. I think it was written by a demented mind, without much grasp on reality. After reading about Emily Bronte's life story, she suffered a lot of pain (from the death of family members) and ill health of her own. And this novel was the product of her suffering.

DBRL_KrisA Nov 26, 2016

This is one of those books that everyone is supposed to have read, a literary classic, blah blah blah. It's been on my to-read list for ages, but I finally got around to reading it because it was on my sister's list as well.
Because it was written in the mid-1800s, I thought for sure I would have difficulty with the language, but it was actually a fairly smooth read. Several of the characters speak a North England dialect, but luckily, this edition of the book had a section of notes at the back that translated most of those characters' dialogue. And there were a number of places where I had to rely on the context to figure out a line or two.
The toughest part of reading this, really, was figuring out why anyone would give a damn about Heathcliff. He is one of the most unpleasant, thoroughly horrible literary characters I've ever met. A terrible, mean-spirited ogre from childhood straight up (almost) until death. His and Catherine's love is held up as one of the great loves in literature, right up there with Romeo and Juliet, but the feeling I got was less star-crossed lovers, and more two thoroughly unlikable egomaniacs that deserved no better than each other. Bill Sykes and Nancy from Oliver Twist were a more sympathetic couple.
Really, there were so few likable characters here; even the sometime-narrator Ellen made me angry. The only one I had even a little sympathy for was Hareton Earnshaw.
That brings up my other main difficulty with reading this book: the inter-marriage of the Earnshaws, the Lintons, and the Heathcliffs. I honestly could have used a scorecard or chart to remember who was married to whom, and how they were all related. And those relationships are really the crux of the whole story - the relationships, inheritances, and how Heathcliff manipulates them.

t
Tracey Devine
Sep 11, 2016

I found this old classic a little complicated in part, especially some of the archaic dialogue (like Joseph the old servant, still not sure what he was saying) took me a few chapters to get into, but interesting in terms of 17th/18th century way of life, especially from a moral standpoint. I feel inclined to re-read it immediately to gain a deeper understanding. Having said that, I was totally hooked by the end.

c
cdove005
Aug 14, 2016

Beautifully written. Gorgeous yet tragic story. I can't believe it took me so long to get around to reading it!

j
jayne_priya
Jun 29, 2016

This is an amazing book about revenge over love.

f
FATIMA NADEEM
Dec 12, 2015

One of the best books you'll ever read, Bronte writes really really well.

g
goddessbeth
Nov 10, 2015

After reading Wuthering Heights, I'm confused as to why anyone considers it a romance. It's tragic. And highly dramatic, in typical Victorian gothic fashion.

Heathcliff is described by others as demonic in behavior and dark in aspect. Certainly everything he says and does indicates a man who takes pleasure in causing others pain, a man who is cunning and patient, a man who has a wild temper and tendency toward violence, and a man who focuses always on the wrongs people do to him.

Catherine is described by others as having a high temper (i.e. she's a drama llama) even though she's beautiful, and being very self-centered. And she certainly seems that way by deed and word, too- she commands everyone in speech, she marries to spite the man she loves (who also loves her, so...why the need for spite?), she pitches fits until she gets her way, and then (spoiler alert!) she dies from...uhm...a hissy fit?

Seriously, that chapter totally lost me. After absolutely no mention of a pregnancy, she has a tantrum about her husband and her lover not paying enough attention to her, starves herself for 3 days, and then wastes away until she gives birth, then dies.

The side characters aren't much better:
Catherine's drunken cowardly brother who doted on his (also now-dead) wife but ignores his young son;
Catherine's sister-in-law, who is so convinced that Heathcliff is a misunderstood Byronic hero that she marries him and then proceeds to be abused by him until she runs away (then gives birth and, of course, dies);
Joseph, the manservant who talks Christian but judges and condemns everyone;
Catherine's husband, whose religion and sole focus in life is doting on his wife (and some weeping);
Nell, the apparently only sane, kind character but who is guilty of doting on every child in her care to the point of enabling bad behavior;
Catherine's brother's son, who grows up abused and neglected, and OF COURSE he becomes the only decent character- so very Victorian;
Catherine's daughter Cathy, a spoiled bossy pants;
Heathcliff's son Linton, a condescending namby pamby bully

I'm sorry, but I just don't see how destructive, self-centered people who take delight in hurting each other and then proclaiming they are soulmates can be romantic. I mean, aside from the literary meaning of Romantic. Their entire story was a train wreck. Compelling, in the way reality TV and soap operas are, and definitely complex....but train wreck characters. And Heathcliff's dying of....uhm...being delirious? I guess it's just too subtle for a dunce like me. It had none of the Turning of the Screw's compelling "is this real or a hallucination", nor any of Jane Eyre's charming "one decent person amid jerks" talent.

If nothing else, this story hits home the perils of spoiling your children. If you indulge them, out of love or laziness, they will become terrible people and wreak havoc for generations. Also, the corruption of a vengeful soul erodes the happiness of all inhabitants for miles around, and for decades.

n
Nymeria23
Jan 06, 2015

When I started reading this book, I wasn't expecting much more than lovey-dovey-ness and old English writing. I found that instead, the harsh reality of life during this time period were shown in the deaths of characters, the accepted views of societal importance and customs was very different (they appeared to be more focused on hosting guests in their homes instead of, for example, meeting out in the town, or just saying hi). and the story description of this book would have been better promoted as a revenge and love story rather than only the latter.
Reading this story was very difficult for me, thanks to the uncommon language and diction, the drawn out descriptions and explanations, and finally the changing narrations. It was however intriguing to read about life and how it transpired in the late 1700s, I admit. I was not expecting the cruel humor and roughness that both Catherine and Heathcliff exhibited though. I thought they would be more like Cathy, all-loving and sympathetic, not harsh and rugged. I really did not like Hindley, but I really liked his son Hareton. I sensed he had a more sensitive, caring soul than his father, though he retained the stubborn and prideful traits. Linton appeared very weak in personality and character, which I found more knowledge-providing than his physical illnesses. I thought Ellen to be kindly though meddling, and Lockwood appeared to be a character added for the singular role of giving reason for the story to be told- I didn't find much character growth or attachment in him. Not sure I really liked the Lintons, or Catehrine and Heathcliff for that matter, but these characters were the most interesting during their interactions with each other.
In the end, I think it was an okay classic, though I'm not likely to read it again
(PS, I felt like I used strange word choice in this review...)

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Summary

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j
jayne_priya
Jun 29, 2016

When Catherine chooses Edgar over her true lover, Heathcliff, he decides to take power over everything.

Kadie2 Aug 17, 2012

Lockwood, a new tenant, has stumbled upon his landlord and the cold house he owns. He realizes, one night when forced to spend the evening at his landlords place, that everyone and everything about the house they live in holds a story. More nosy than curious, Lockwood persues a maid to tell the haunted story of Heathcliff (the landlord) and how he came to be.

p
p_gzpata9730
Jul 25, 2012

2 people that have way different back roundes but fall in love despite what evereyone says

l
LuluY
Aug 15, 2011

A story within a story- 2 tales of 2 generations that fall madly in love, and the darkness that ensues because one's love is denied. This isn't some pretty love story, it's a dark yet memorable novel of how love manages to live on- despite all odds.

FavouriteFiction Sep 30, 2009

A tale of a doomed romance between Catherine, the daughter of the house and Heathcliff a foundling.

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Midnight_Rose
Dec 03, 2012

Midnight_Rose thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

1
15mariams
Aug 17, 2012

15mariams thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

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kitten97
Aug 01, 2012

kitten97 thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

Quotes

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re_discover
Sep 10, 2017

Nelly (Ellen): "...treachery, and violence, are spears pointed at both ends- they wound those who resort to them, worse than their enemies" (211).

p
p_gzpata9730
Jul 25, 2012

love is a sacrifice

lilybelle Jul 29, 2008

"...I am Heathcliff! He's always, always in my mind--not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself, but as my own being"

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k
kitten97
Aug 01, 2012

Coarse Language: There is a lot of old time coarse language used by many of the characters throughout the story.

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