The Zoomable Universe

The Zoomable Universe

An Epic Tour Through Cosmic Scale, From Almost Everything to Nearly Nothing

Book - 2017 | First edition
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Contents: Almost everything
Darkness and light
The slow, the fast, and the fantastic
Planets, planets, planets
A world we call Earth
Being conscious in the cosmos
From many to one
The undergrowth
The emptiness of matter
It's full of...fields
From nearly nothing to almost everything
Publisher: New York : Scientific American/Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2017
Edition: First edition
Branch Call Number: 523.1 S
Characteristics: xi, 206 pages : color illustrations ; 25 cm
Additional Contributors: Miller, Ron 1947-- Illustrator
ISBN: 9780374715717
0374715718

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SkokieStaff_Steven Nov 27, 2017

If you have a hankering to ponder the immensity of the universe in slack-jawed amazement or wish to contemplate astonishingly large numbers that have nothing to do with unfunded pension liabilities, I have just the book for you. It is Caleb Scharf’s “The Zoomable Universe: An Epic Tour through Co... Read More »


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SkokieStaff_Steven Nov 27, 2017

If you have a hankering to ponder the immensity of the universe in slack-jawed amazement or wish to contemplate astonishingly large numbers that have nothing to do with unfunded pension liabilities, I have just the book for you. It is Caleb Scharf’s “The Zoomable Universe: An Epic Tour through Cosmic Scale, from Almost Everything to Nearly Nothing.” Reading this book with its gorgeous illustrations and wealth of well-designed infographics is like walking through the coolest science museum exhibit ever. (I’ve actually done something like this in the American Museum of Natural History’s Scales of the Universe hall. This book is much cheaper than a trip to NYC.) One of the book’s main points is just how much emptiness there is in the universe, something that anyone who’s ever driven through Nebraska can relate to. Best of all, the book is easily to comprehend, at least until Scharf reaches the quantum realm and descends into nonsensical gibberish, but this is hardly his fault. I even enjoyed reading the book’s notes, something I almost never do because, well, I have better uses for my time. This book will now be my go-to science book recommendation along with Bill Bryson’s “A Short History of Nearly Everything.”

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