When They Call You A Terrorist

When They Call You A Terrorist

A Black Lives Matter Memoir

Book - 2018 | First edition
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A memoir by the co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement explains the movement's position of love, humanity, and justice, challenging perspectives that have negatively labeled the movement's activists while calling for essential political changes.
Publisher: New York : St. Martin's Press, 2018
Edition: First edition
Branch Call Number: 305.896073 K
Characteristics: 257 pages ; 20 cm
Additional Contributors: Bandele, Asha - Author
ISBN: 9781250171085
1250171083

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From Library Staff

As one of the founders of the Black Lives Matter movement, Khan-Cullors uses her memoir to examine how her personal experiences with poverty, police, and prisons shaped a movement rooted in justice and humanity.


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b
becker
Mar 11, 2019

This is a memoir written by one of the people who gave birth to the Black Lives Matter Movement. My feelings about this book were up and down, especially in the first half of the book. I could really feel the generation gap between myself and the author in the way she thought or chose to express herself. Yet, there is no denying that she made her point. She gives dozens and dozens of examples of outrageous injustices, some from her own life and family and others from her community. Some of her stories were things I was familiar with because they were big news stories but many of them were everyday events that you don't hear about. Each example had me baffled. In the end I think it was a successful book because she accomplished exactly what she was trying to, by giving me a wider view of the situation

b
Britt23
Nov 24, 2018

Very heavy book to read it’s eye opening and very detailed. Overall I would recommend this book to anyone it gives you more insight on the woman who created BLM and the struggles she endured in her childhood all the way unto adulthood. Situations that still effect most blacks today.

Such an important book for those of us who are privileged enough to live our lives relatively free of institutional abuse and systematic oppression. Khan-Cullors writes so passionately and deeply about her pain, her struggles and loss, her activism and triumphs, that I feel like I shouldn't be reading this--it's too personal. But, it’s exactly what I should be reading. Khan-Cullors doesn’t edit herself to make white people comfortable. She’s radical, queer, and speaks her truth without apologies. She’s not a perfectly packaged talking head that makes the BLM movement digestible for cable news shows.

She exposes the damage the myth of “personal responsibility”, among other things, does to the black community, she calls for community and national accountability for the inequality and struggles black people face--the high prison population, drug use, violence, etc. Her mother who works three jobs and still lives in poverty; Her father, laid off by GM, with no further educational opportunism, no safety net, no jobs; Her brother, struggling with mental illness and no access to healthcare. She calls out the institutions and polices that create the conditions that allow for this. She examines how, even within the black community, their struggles are blamed solely on immorality, irresponsibility, bad choices, etc. She doesn’t dismiss the idea of personal responsibility altogether, but points out how it’s often weaponized against the black community; prescribed as the solution to their struggles, rather than actual access to education, jobs, and healthcare.

Please add this book to your list. Along with the forward by Angela Davis, it’s one of the most important book on this topic to date.

KatieD_KCMO Nov 23, 2018

Such an important book for those of us who are privileged enough to live our lives relatively free of institutional abuse and systematic oppression. Khan-Cullors writes so passionately and deeply about her pain, her struggles and loss, her activism and triumphs, that I feel like I shouldn't be reading this--it's too personal. But, it’s exactly what I should be reading. Khan-Cullors doesn’t edit herself to make white people comfortable. She’s radical, queer, and speaks her truth without apologies. She’s not a perfectly packaged talking head that makes the BLM movement digestible for cable news shows.

She exposes the damage the myth of “personal responsibility”, among other things, does to the black community, she calls for community and national accountability for the inequality and struggles black people face--the high prison population, drug use, violence, etc. Her mother who works three jobs and still lives in poverty; Her father, laid off by GM, with no further educational opportunism, no safety net, no jobs; Her brother, struggling with mental illness and no access to healthcare. She calls out the institutions and polices that create the conditions that allow for this. She examines how, even within the black community, their struggles are blamed solely on immorality, irresponsibility, bad choices, etc. She doesn’t dismiss the idea of personal responsibility altogether, but points out how it’s often weaponized against the black community; prescribed as the solution to their struggles, rather than actual access to education, jobs, and healthcare.

Please add this book to your list. Along with the forward by Angela Davis, it’s one of the most important book on this topic to date.

m
Miller1114
Jul 19, 2018

The writer's analysis of the systematic and institutional racism in this country is spot on. Those in power complain that the poor aren't doing anything to help themselves but obstacles are constantly placed in their path to move forward. I would recommend this as mandatory reading for junior high and high school students.

DBRL_ReginaF Mar 07, 2018

This is such a powerful and heart wrenching book. Everyone needs to read this one. And we, as a society, need to do better.

l
lukasevansherman
Feb 10, 2018

The co-founder of Black Lives Matter tells the story of her life, the beginnings of the BLM movement, its mission, and the deep racial divides in the country. A good read for anyone looking for a more clear picture than what we're often given by the idea. Introduction by Angela Davis.

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